Blu, a furry giant of an American Akita was with Royvon for the Behaviour Modification Programme because of dog aggression towards other dogs. One of our expert dog trainers, Ross was working with Blu during his three-week stay to socialise him on-site Royvon and offsite to be able to correct his behaviour.

Ross has been teaching Blu how to peacefully approach other dogs so as he’s not rushing over and charging them. As we present to you in this video, watch Blu during his departure lesson where Ross teaches his owners the positive dog training methods he used to accomplish more than positive results.

Learn more about Behaviour Modification Programme here – http://royvon.topclickmediawebdesign.co.uk/dog-training/behavior-modification-course/

12 Comments

  1. N2 DaAIR

    September 27, 2018 at 10:45 pm

    Really misguided information here! This is NOT a dog that is in any way aggressive towards other dogs. Curious? Yes! Aggressive, no! My Akita however, IS aggressive towards other dogs. If that smaller dog in the vid were to approach my dog in that manner, at that distance, my dog would have shown you what aggressive dogs look like. She would have torn that dog to pieces. My dog is WAYYYY too aggressive towards other dogs. Even her sister is at risk at times, however she doesn’t bother her brother. She seems to have the attitude of kill first, then move on. I’m not sure really of how to break her of this, as it seems to be a natural instinct of hers to protect her space no matter the situation. Anyway, the dog presented here is not very aggressive, imho.

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  2. Jon S.

    September 27, 2018 at 10:45 pm

    This video didn't show anything. You should make videos with unbalanced dogs and then show how you make them balanced. Just saying.

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  3. Nomad Kingpin

    September 27, 2018 at 10:45 pm

    Hate the music with the high volume!  I want to listen to the trainer and observe without loud music.

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  4. Brian Jordan

    September 27, 2018 at 10:45 pm

    I've only had problems with my Akitas when other dogs rush up to them with their hackles up. All dogs are different but socializing them early sets the demeanor towards other dogs.
    That being said, never underestimate the defensive nature of an Akita.

    Reply

  5. N2 DaAIR

    September 27, 2018 at 10:45 pm

    This was pretty meaningless. This dog is in no way aggressive. Wants to play? Yes! Aggressive dog encounters are far more stressful. I have an aggressive Akita, and if another dog approaches us she will want to attack immediately. Curiosity is not aggression.

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  6. Dawn Hamilton

    September 27, 2018 at 10:45 pm

    What a sweet Akita, and a beautiful one, too! Please be advised: You will never train an Akita that is truly aggressive toward other dogs not to be. It's all about the amount of prey drive in that particular dog. No training is going to remove a strong and aggressive prey drive from any dog, Akita or otherwise, if it's there. This is not said to be argumentative or rude – I simply don't want people to kid themselves (or be kidded by someone else in a video) that a dog with a prey drive strong enough to go after another dog to kill it or hurt it can be trained not to do so. The remedy is to keep that aggressive dog on a leash at all times and not EVER allow it to sniff noses with other dogs or be turned loose at dog parks or even at home with other animals. A leash is a very small obstacle between a large, powerful dog and its prey, so the aggressive dog must be kept from getting close enough to other dogs to attack, even when on a leash. I have 20 years of experience with Akitas and was introduced to the breed by a well-respected and very experienced breeder/owner who gave me some sound advice, and I had good instruction from the start. I know and love the breed. Training in the area of aggression does not make a difference; the dog will always revert back to its aggressiveness toward other dogs, and someone's sweet dog can be killed in literally 2 seconds. Let me stress that not every Akita will hurt other dogs, but it’s not the norm for them to be super-friendly all the time to other animals. (See all the dogs happily playing together in the enclosure behind the main one in this video? See any Akitas? Nope, me either.) The ones that are wonderful with other animals are the exception, not the rule. The ones that have the prey drive to hurt other animals WILL DO SO IF THEY CAN GET TO THOSE OTHER ANIMALS, and no training will eradicate that. Also, the same Akita that is aggressive toward other dogs and animals can be a sweetie to its family and other humans, so don't automatically assume that if the Akita next door seems like a sweetheart with its family that it won't harm your Fluffy or Fido; if it has a strong and aggressive prey drive toward animals, it WILL kill your pet. Akitas are not like other dogs, so please be aware. They are wonderful dogs with their own families, and sometimes they are great with other people and other animals, too (I've owned both types), but Akitas can be dangerous or deadly, and if the strong and aggressive prey drive is there, then training is not going to remove it. Finally, it's my opinion that the dog in this video had no real aggression tendencies in the first place; if he had, he wouldn't behave the way he did in the video (paying more attention to snacks than the other dog and also simply walking up to the other dog in a friendly manner). In the three weeks the gentleman in the video said he had been worked with, this is not a dog that went from aggressive to sweet; I firmly believe that he was already a good boy before the training. The aggressive Akitas I have known, even after three weeks (or three years) of "training" would have been focused in on the other dog to the point of excluding all other items of usual interest in their surroundings, pulling toward the other dog, and NOT caring about getting a treat from someone's hand. This beautiful guy had no aggression problems from day one, IMO. Before his training time at this facility, he might just have been excited to see other dogs and rushed up to them, and that's why he was being worked with – to correct his exuberance on the leash and to help the owner gain better control of him while out walking, at the vet, etc. That's a whole different thing than true aggression, which involves a dog with a strong and aggressive prey drive rushing toward another dog to attack, and that cannot be "trained' or "rehabbed" out of an Akita or any other breed.

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  7. Dallis MacLoed

    September 27, 2018 at 10:45 pm

    ANSWER AH QUESTION ❓ 4 ME CAN I HAVE ANOTHER AKITA FROM AH ANOTHER PACK OR NOT DALLIS MACLEOD GLASGOW SCOTLAND

    Reply

  8. Sequoia Bellanca

    September 27, 2018 at 10:45 pm

    What dog aggression?

    Reply

  9. Robina G Bryans

    September 27, 2018 at 10:45 pm

    I need this my female Akita doesn't know how to meet and greet other dogs. She charges in and goes into full play mode without a sniff, this doesn't go down well with other dogs or their owners.
    Being an Akita most owners are too afraid to help me socialise her.

    Reply

  10. curtis larsen

    September 27, 2018 at 10:45 pm

    I socialized my female with other dogs , its like she has a switch in her head that turns and she gets crazy i slow her down relax her but this dog looks very calm lol compared to mine. Its crazy my brothers autralian sheperd comes over and shes calm as can be. Also at dog parks, shes fantastic. Its just other dogs snap at my akita idk why, and then they get all pissed at me im like wtf . So im not sure what i can do, all my dog wants to do is play literally. Maybe its just me lol..

    Reply

  11. John Trott

    September 27, 2018 at 10:45 pm

    I have 2 Females right now ,why didn't the owner socialized the dog as a pup? Akita are wonderful dogs and give you their heart and soul

    Reply

  12. Doug H. in VA

    September 27, 2018 at 10:45 pm

    if the dog is in rehab, why is he allowed to beg and nose his way into a hand for a snack ?

    Reply

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