One of my students teaches her puppy to roll over using positive reinforcement (If it was negative reinforcement, the dog could have just ran away).
As several viewers have noted, the student’s use of force rule out shaping. This use of force to affect behavior is known as prompting.

36 Comments

  1. Bhagwant Singh

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    in the end he is near to my face …

    Reply

  2. Wendy Alexander

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    How is this operant conditioning?

    Reply

  3. dolfijntjelover100

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    Although no animal was harmed it is even more friendly to use no force and it is preferable to use minimal luring. Let the animal learn by itself with very small, successive approximations. Make a training plan before you start the training. Write down the approximations you expect to use. It prevent you from wanting succes to fast. Remember: the animal doesn't know what you expect and what you think! As a trainer you learn a lot from approximations and knowing what you want to reinforce.

    Reply

  4. Ryan de la Vega

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    I agree with previous comments. You're not conditioning in this video and you shouldn't have to be repeating the cue "roll over." Your dog doesn't know what it means yet.  And pushing your dog into position is not teaching him what "roll over" means. 

    Reply

  5. John Gray

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    Boston Terrier.

    Reply

  6. sadie sweazen

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    i do not believe in treat training. correction modivation and praise work way faster than that. the dog is clearly in a pattern with sit shake lay down and roll over. and the dog is clearly just worried about the treat..not any type of obedience there…

    Reply

  7. zacharycat

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    My cat learned to roll over quicker than that.

    Reply

  8. jnetlife

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    very cute puppy! i train dogs similarly as well even though people say you shouldn't use physical force like the pushing, I think it's just something that can be done but with good judgment and carefully because it can backfire. Please check out my channel to see my dog tricks!

    Reply

  9. Haider Aljabori

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    I don't agree with your comment. Operant Conditioning using this method is actually way to reward the test subject when they learn how to do the task that is asked of them…the fact that the treat is given after the dog rolls over proves that when the dog was being taught to roll over, it associated that it had to complete the "roll over" stage to get the treat…(im sitting in a lecture about operant conditioning right this second)

    Reply

  10. breaneainn

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    this makes me giggle.

    Reply

  11. santeria720

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    I bet if you prompted the first 3-4 trials immediately (errorless learning), he would have acquired "roll over" quicker.

    Reply

  12. William Knapp

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    timdr23 According to Thorndike's Law of Effect, the response doesn't have to be accidental. She pushes, Jack responds, the response is reinforced.

    Reply

  13. Timothy Riseborough

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    This is not operant conditioning as he doesnt accidentally roll over!!

    Reply

  14. Zarkow

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    The best way to get the puppy to learn to roll by itself is to bring the candy over its neck so it turns its head and will push itself out of balance. It works surprisingly well.

    Reply

  15. Ibn Al Rawandi

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    This was amazing. Well done.

    Reply

  16. Candorsmayhem

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    @knappsych This is an example of negative reinforcement. The dog does the action, and when he does, the negative stimuli of being pushed into position is removed. Yes, he is then rewarded, but it's not for doing anything. He's simply being rewarded for being in a particular position. It's like when you scold a dog for peeing on the floor afterwards. They don't see that as "I peed on the floor, I'm bad." They see it as "Pee on the floor is bad." Big difference.

    Reply

  17. William Knapp

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    @JaimeRBCBA I try to avoid using the words positive or negative when referring to stimuli because these words are used by psychologists to describe what happens with the stimuli, regardless of their valence. I like to think about the terms in the correlational sense.
    PR: more behavior = more appetitive stim
    NR: more behavior = less aversive stim
    PP: more behavior = more aversive stim
    NP: more behavior = less appetitive stim

    Reply

  18. William Knapp

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    @JaimeRBCBA Perhaps I should have been more clear with my statement about negative reinforcement. You are absolutely correct that negative reinforcement isn't punishment. @StacyBS suggested that Jack learned through negative reinforcement. Instead of saying "If the push was a negative reinforcement" when I should have said "If escaping the push was negatively reinforcing." Sorry.

    Reply

  19. William Knapp

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    @execratexmexbaby Thanks for the backup!

    Reply

  20. William Knapp

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    @KatrynMerteuil Nice summary, thanks.

    Reply

  21. William Knapp

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    @catalin30 Sorry if the purpose of this video was misconstrued. This isn't supposed to be the best method of teaching a dog to do a trick, only an application of learning principles for an extra credit project. @samsmoti proposes an alternative that seems likely to produce quicker results without resorting to prompting the dog as my student did.

    Reply

  22. William Knapp

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    @samsmoti Excellent tip, thank you.

    Reply

  23. William Knapp

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    @ShaylaDanielleMusic Unfortunately, I don't know.

    Reply

  24. William Knapp

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    @jylnbair Sorry, I don't know.

    Reply

  25. William Knapp

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    @Lottiesdogs You can shape that in 5 minutes? I'd love to see a video. Please post a video response.

    Reply

  26. William Knapp

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    @max1morgan2 According to the dates on the video a month and 10 days passed from the first day to the last demonstration.

    Reply

  27. William Knapp

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    @Miikaika25 I agree, my student should have given Jack a treat after each roll, prompted or not, during training to speed learning. Thanks.

    Reply

  28. William Knapp

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    @Candorsmayhem: You are correct that this isn't an example of shaping (see my earlier responses and the video description). As long as the "cue" reliably predicts reinforcement in a reasonable time frame, many organisms, including humans, rats, pigeons, and dogs can pick up on the conditional relationship between the cue and reinforcement. I'm confused as to why you state that this isn't positive reinforcement. What is your alternative interpretation?

    Reply

  29. Candorsmayhem

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    @knappsych (continued) Then when he does the finished behavior, roll over, you say the cue AS he is doing the action, approximately 30 times. Then you move the cue to immediately before he was going to do the behavior anyway, for another 30 reps. Then you move the cue to being an actual cue. What you have here is an example of operant conditioning, as all training is, but this isn't positive reinforcement, which makes use of rewarding a behavior, and ignoring the bad. (IE you wouldn't say 'no')

    Reply

  30. Candorsmayhem

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    @knappsych Not true. You simply don't introduce a cue until the behavior is at it's peak, so the cue isn't confused with what the behavior was before your bar was raised. If this were true shaping, you might click and reinforce for each increment, 1 might be shifting weight to the side, then laying on his side, laying on his back, etc. You increase the criteria necessary to give the treat as the dog demonstrates understanding of what is being desired (IE he repeats the action)

    Reply

  31. max1morgan2

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    How long did it take to teach him to rollover like this? He looks really small in the beginning of the video and then looks much bigger at the end when he rolls over.

    Reply

  32. Miikaika25

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    you were messing things up after you rolled him over you should give him the treat regardless that way he can be conditioned. I taught my dog all those tricks except the roll over part when she was a puppy, she never learned roll over because I was not very persistent with it, I basically wanted her to know how to sit and stay and come. We have to practice it every once in a while to keep her on her toes.

    Reply

  33. kamana palama

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    This is really great. I got a smaller dog, I want him to learn how to roll over but hes a savage and will just stare at the treat in a trance. Maybe later in the future if i get a new dog i'll train it when its younger

    Reply

  34. Gogoleila

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    thanks for the video… I was thrilled when he finally rolled over…

    Reply

  35. Jeremiah Garcia

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    she forgot to tell the dog it was doing good when it obeyed her command which would be even more positive reinforcement. Oh well, we get the jest of it. Such a cute puppy!

    Reply

  36. Huehuehue

    September 5, 2018 at 3:12 am

    HE DID IT!!! great

    Reply

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